News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • March 12, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus — Use Reliable Sources of Information

    Central Piedmont employees and students are encouraged to acquaint themselves with the website of the N.C. Department of Health & Human Services, and make it one of your primary sources for information and updates about coronavirus COVID-19.

  • March 12, 2020 Message to the College on Coronavirus

    Mecklenburg County health officials announced today the first two presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 (the disease caused by the novel coronavirus) tested in the county. Read more on Mecklenburg County's COVID-19 Update.

    Central Piedmont is closely following these developments and continues to be in frequent contact with local and state health officials about this evolving situation from the Mecklenburg County- and North Carolina-perspective.

    The college is currently open and operating under a normal schedule. Our students and faculty remain on spring break through Sunday, March 15. College leaders are meeting regularly to discuss the latest updates and will be making further decisions and announcements, as needed, over the next few days

    In the meantime, please follow the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) guidelines for keeping yourself safe, including utilizing teleconferencing when possible, following careful hygiene directions, and staying home if you are sick or not feeling well. See the NC Department of Health & Human Services website, and make it one of your primary sources for information and updates about coronavirus COVID-19.

    Again, the college will continue to provide regular updates via email as new information is available.

    Visit coronavirus information for all of Central Piedmont's updates on COVID-19.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus — Travel Restrictions Implemented

    Central Piedmont is monitoring the spread of the coronavirus closely as this is an evolving situation and the care of our students and employees is of utmost importance. As of Tuesday, March 10, seven North Carolinians have tested positive for the coronavirus. North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency on March 10, but did not recommend closing schools.

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus — NC Governor Declares State of Emergency

    According to the Charlotte Observer, “North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency Tuesday as leaders and public health officials continue to deal with the coronavirus. The state now has seven people who have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, health officials said. All of the patients are in isolation while officials identify close contacts.” There are no confirmed cases in Mecklenburg County at this time.

  • Central Piedmont contributes $1.2 billion annually to Mecklenburg economy

    The results of an economic impact study conducted for Central Piedmont found the institution contributes $1.2 billion annually to the Mecklenburg County economy, an amount equal to one percent of the county’s gross regional product.

    Central Piedmont’s measured annual $1.2-billion economic impact includes $155.4 million in operations spending, $36.5 million in construction spending, $42.1 million in student spending, and a $919.5-million impact made by college alumni who live and work in Mecklenburg County.

    “For more than 56 years, Central Piedmont Community College has established a record and reputation for making a positive impact in Mecklenburg County,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, Central Piedmont president. “We know generations of students and hundreds of employers have been benefitted from having a comprehensive college and workforce development partner such as Central Piedmont serving Charlotte-Mecklenburg. We also know Central Piedmont makes a significant impact as an economic engine, boosting the county’s economy and generating an excellent return on the investment made by students and taxpayers.”

    The economic modeling firm Emsi conducted the study, looking at college data from the 2017-18 fiscal year. The study found that for every dollar students invest in their Central Piedmont education they receive $3.20 in future earnings for an annual rate of return of 15.5 percent. For every dollar of public money invested in the college, taxpayers receive $1.70 for an average rate of return of 4.5 percent.

    For more details about the economic impact study, review the economic impact fact sheet (PDF).

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus — First Case in NC Announced

    North Carolina Emergency Management leaders announced yesterday that a person from Wake County has tested positive for novel coronavirus (COVID-19). It's the first identified case in NC. The news release states, "The person is doing well and is in isolation at home." 

  • Message to the College on Coronavirus — Countries with Travel Restrictions

    Central Piedmont officials are monitoring the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) to a number of countries —  including Italy, South Korea, and Japan — over the past several days.

  • Central Piedmont selected for year two of Metallica Scholars Initiative

    The rock band Metallica’s All Within My Hands Foundation (AWMH) has once again selected Central Piedmont Community College to participate in the second iteration of the Metallica Scholars Initiative – a program that supports career and technical education programs at community colleges across the nation.

    In 2018, the band partnered with the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), to select 10 community colleges from across the country that best demonstrated support of relevant jobs skill training for community college students. Central Piedmont was one of the 10 colleges chosen to receive $100,000. The college used the funds to help Central Piedmont students gain the training they needed to enter the workforce. These students became the college’s first cohort of Metallica Scholars.

    Year two of the Metallica Scholars Initiative:

    • awards a $50,000 grant to the original 10 colleges, and challenges each institution to match the grant amount. As a result, the overall grant investment in career and technical education at each college will total $100,000.
    • includes expanding the program in 2020 from 10 to 15 schools. The five new community college partners will each receive a $100,000 grant, making AWMH’s cumulative contribution $1.5 million.

    “We are proud to report that 80 percent of our Metallica Scholars who were scheduled to graduate in the 2019 spring and summer semesters were successful,” said Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, president of Central Piedmont. “The Metallica Scholars Initiative is transforming lives, providing students with the financial assistance and support services they need to succeed inside and outside the classroom.”

    Central Piedmont will continue to use the grant funds to provide direct support for students enrolled in one of four healthcare career programs but who need financial assistance to complete their studies and become licensed healthcare professionals. The project will continue to focus on high-demand healthcare programs, including dental assisting, medical assisting, ophthalmic medical personnel, and pharmacy technology, and will target underrepresented students who would not be able to complete their program or obtain credentials without financial support. The goal of the initiative is to ensure students receive relevant jobs skills that will make them competitive in the healthcare field.

    AWMH works closely with AACC to implement and manage the program. Recipient colleges of the group’s 2020 $1,500,000 grant are all AACC members and are located in communities visited by Metallica during its recent U.S. tour.

  • WSOC-TV report: Many students overlook community colleges

    Community colleges are often the way you can have it all when it comes to higher education: You can have “the dream without the bill.”

    That’s how WSOC-TV, the region’s ABC affiliate, described the excellent option of community college for earning a degree without the stress of heavy debt hanging over your head. At Central Piedmont, it's possible to achieve the dream of higher education minus the nightmare of crippling debt that can sometimes follow.

    Getting a high-quality education at an affordable price is a reality for many Central Piedmont students, including the following alumni who were featured in a two-part WSOC-TV news story on the student debt crisis.

  • Allstate apprenticeship program moves the upward mobility needle

    Central Piedmont’s Work-based Learning department recently partnered with Allstate on the “Good Hands College Apprenticeship,” a paid program that gives students the opportunity to obtain hands-on work experience at Allstate while completing their associate degree or certificate in cybersecurity.

    More than 20 Central Piedmont students applied for the 30-hours/week apprenticeship program; however, job offers were extended to only three candidates – Sabrina Carr, Rushit Patel and Joshua Pierce – who began working for Allstate on Jan. 21, 2020, and joined Central Piedmont student Shanelle Keels, who was already on staff.

    As apprentices, Central Piedmont’s students will work in teams to catch real-time hackers, attempting to break into Allstate’s systems; help monitor and create best practices for how to keep Allstate’s customers – and their data – safe; and gain valuable leaderships skills by participating in a variety of mentoring programs. For their efforts, the students will be paid to learn – $18.64/hour to be exact.

    “Allstate’s model of learn and earn is the perfect example of a program that is creating upward mobility in the lives of others,” explains Ed Injaychock, director of work-based learning at Central Piedmont. “It’s helping bridge the gap, providing our students with the training and funding they need to secure a better-paying job or family-sustaining career in the future.”

    “We are thrilled for the opportunities this will provide to Central Piedmont’s students and the Allstate Corporation,” added Dave St. Clair, vice president of security operations, hosting services, and the Charlotte Talent Center for Allstate Insurance Company.

    Learn more about Central Piedmont’s Work-based Learning programs.