News and Features

What's going on in the Central Piedmont community and what Central Piedmont is doing in the community.

  • Message to College on Coronavirus: No mask requirements as of March 13

    In the days after the college announced its most recent mask guidelines, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated the nation’s face covering guidelines. As a result, the college will begin to follow CDC direction as of Sunday, March 13, when spring break ends.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday, February 25, that people in areas considered to be low or medium risk can go indoors without masks. As it has since the COVID-19 pandemic began, the college will follow the CDC’s lead.

    As of Sunday, March 13, masks will be optional anywhere on Central Piedmont college property and will no longer be required in classrooms and labs.

    Nothing prevents students and employees from continuing to wear face coverings wherever they are on campus if they choose. Please keep in mind individuals should not be asked to disclose their vaccination status or why they choose or don’t choose to wear a face covering outside of class. This is private information and should be respected.

    Please be understanding as students and employees make their decisions concerning face masks. Please continue to monitor yourself for any COVID-19-related symptoms, and stay home if you feel ill at all. If your symptoms persist, please contact a healthcare provider. Please report if you are exposed to or test positive for COVID-19 by sending a prompt email to wecare@cpcc.edu.

  • Gov. Cooper Visits, Celebrates College’s Success with Awarding Longleaf Commitment Grants

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper met on Central Piedmont’s Central Campus Thursday with college leadership, elected officials, and students to celebrate Central Piedmont’s success with awarding the Longleaf Commitment Grant to in-need students located throughout the region.

    The Longleaf Commitment Grant was originally announced by Gov. Cooper in May 2021 and gives North Carolina high school graduates who plan to attend one of the state’s “Great 58” community colleges the opportunity to receive a grant – not a loan – to cover tuition and fees toward a degree or to attain transfer credit. 

    Gov Cooper chose to kick off his Longleaf Commitment Grant tour in Charlotte because Central Piedmont has the second highest number of Longleaf Grant recipients among N.C. community colleges. To date, 1,296 Central Piedmont students have received $716,089 in Longleaf Commitment Grant funds.

    “We want to make education affordable. We want students to put money in their pockets,” said Gov. Cooper. “The Longleaf Commitment Grants help boost student performance because they allow students to concentrate on their school work. That’s why it’s so important that this grant keeps going and remains available in the future.”

    During the press event, Gov. Cooper participated in a roundtable discussion with N.C. Community College System President Thomas Stith III, Central Piedmont President Dr. Kandi Deitemeyer, Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Chris Cathcart, N.C. State Senator Joyce Waddell, N.C. House Representative Carolyn Logan, and Longleaf Commitment Grant recipients (and Central Piedmont students) Noemi Henriquez, Katherine Perez Puquir, and Leila Turner.

    The group discussed how the grants are helping students pursue their education, the steps Central Piedmont has taken to successfully share publicly that Longleaf Grant funds are available, and more.

    “The Longleaf Commitment Grant funds helped ease the financial burden on my mom who was paying for three college-aged children,” explained Turner. “The grant is not only enabling me to hold on to my precious college savings so I can one day use them toward my four-year degree, but it’s also helping me concentrate on my studies and not have to take on a full-time job to pay for my tuition and fees.”

    Learn more about the North Carolina Longleaf Commitment Grant, including its requirements, and get connected to helpful resources. Contact Financial Aid for additional information.

  • Harris Campus helps bring art to the people

    Central Piedmont is excited to partner with SouthEnd ARTS to bring “OUTER LIMITS,” a 58-piece art exhibition to its Harris I Second Floor Atrium, located on the college’s Harris Campus, now through August 20, 2022.

    The six-month art exhibition, curated by Zaire McPhearson and the largest in SouthEnd ARTS’ history, features the work of more than 30 local artists, including Susan Ballard, Pascale Doxy, Molly English, Daysha Lancaster, Stephanie McCall, and more.

    McPhearson is a contemporary artist and Brock Family Instructor at Duke University. Her work incorporates photography, graphic design, painting, sound design, sculpture, as well as other mediums, and reflects the complex issues that shape our diverse, global, and ever-changing world. It is through this lens that McPhearson helped select the artists for the “OUTER LIMITS” exhibition and which works from their portfolios to display.

    “This exhibition allows us to educate residents outside of a traditional classroom setting, in new and exciting ways,” explains Moses Fox III, director of campus affairs for Central Piedmont’s Harris Campus. “Artwork engages individuals on a variety of levels – both artistically, emotionally, and spiritually – and we’re proud to bring art to the people, serving the local community as both an educational and arts resource.”

    Central Piedmont plans to host a handful of events throughout the six-month exhibition to celebrate the artists’ work. It will hold a private, Jurored Awards Ceremony on March 18 to celebrate the artists’ many accomplishments, and plans to highlight the exhibit more publicly on April 14, from 4 – 7 p.m., during its week-long Sensoria celebration, which is open – and free – to all.

    Individuals unable to attend the April 14 event, are invited to visit Harris I, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. – 8 p.m., to view the exhibition in person. For directions, visit cpcc.edu/locations/harris-campus.

  • Attend a Career & College Promise Info Session, Earn Tuition-Free College Credits

    Central Piedmont invites rising high school juniors and seniors to attend an upcoming Career & College Promise information session, any Monday through July 18, from 4:30 – 6 p.m. (Please note: there is no session on April 18.) The sessions are held virtually via Webex.

    Career & College Promise provides seamless dual enrollment educational opportunities to eligible North Carolina high school students, giving them the opportunity to earn college credit tuition-free.

    To enter the program, high school students must demonstrate college readiness and meet other eligibility requirements.

    See how our students are conquering possibility through the Career & College Promise program:

    Learn more about Central Piedmont’s dual-enrollment program or contact the college’s Career & College Promise team at ccp@cpcc.edu.

  • Message to College on Coronavirus: College Moving to Face-mask-Optional Status Feb. 26

    Effective February 26, Central Piedmont Community College will make the use of face masks optional on campus, except for classrooms and labs. Students and faculty members should continue to wear face coverings when in their classes and labs through the end of the 2022 spring semester. This decision was based on the following: 

    • On February 16, the Mecklenburg County Board of County Commissioners voted to relax COVID-19 safety restrictions in the county, based on recommendations from the Mecklenburg County Health Department. Commissioners voted to end the county face-mask-wearing requirement which had been in place since late-August 2021. Mecklenburg County’s decision to no longer require the use of face masks is based on the rapidly decreasing numbers of positive COVID-19 cases being seen in the county. Beginning February 26, Mecklenburg County will no longer require people to wear face masks in indoor public spaces. 
    • On February 17, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper encouraged ending all local face mask mandates, based on declining COVID case numbers across the state and the great availability of vaccines.

    Nothing prevents employees and students from continuing to wear face coverings wherever they are on campus if they so choose. Please keep in mind individuals should not be asked to disclose their vaccination status or why they choose or don’t choose to wear a face covering outside of class. This is private information and should be respected.

    Please be understanding as our employees and students make their decisions concerning face masks outside of class. Please continue to monitor yourself for any COVID-19-related symptoms, and stay home if you feel ill at all. If your symptoms persist, please contact a healthcare provider. Please report if you are exposed to or test positive for COVID-19 by sending a prompt email to wecare@cpcc.edu.

    The Mecklenburg County Health Department and the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services strongly recommend unvaccinated persons eligible for vaccination be vaccinated as soon as possible. Likewise, Central Piedmont encourages all members of the college community – students, faculty, and staff – to be vaccinated, if they so choose, as soon as possible.

    Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine and boosters by accessing the following resources: StarMed Health, Walgreens, CVS, Novant Health, and Atrium Health.

  • Central Piedmont Selects Artists to Design Mural for New Student Union

    Central Piedmont Community College has selected two local artists, Rosalia Torres-Weiner and Felicia Sky Sutton, to create a large-scale mural honoring the past history of the college, documenting the present, and reflecting the aspirations of Central Piedmont students for the future.

    Torres-Weiner and Sutton, former Central Piedmont students, were chosen from a highly skilled pool of applicants to work collaboratively with students, faculty, and staff to create an interactive mural. The art work will be located in the dining area of the college’s new student union, a part of Central Piedmont’s new Parr Center complex, located on the Central Campus. The Parr Center will serve as the student services hub and include a new campus library, a 430-seat theater, a rooftop terrace, a 1,100- square-foot art gallery, and a maker’s space for students to explore careers and creativity. The Parr Center will open to students and the public later this year.

    According to the project’s request for proposal, the mural’s graphic design will span an 8-foot by 90-foot wall on the first floor of the 184,000-square-foot building. Its placement will benefit from the nearby dining space, which is flooded with natural light thanks to the floor-to-ceiling glass windows that overlook the Charlotte city skyline. The mural will demonstrate the college’s commitment to the fine arts and its support for the creative culture of its surrounding community.

    Rosalia Torres-Weiner is an artist, activist and community leader in Charlotte. Her art captures the themes, colors and rich symbolism of her native home of Mexico. She took her first steps toward a creative career by taking graphic design courses at Central Piedmont. After operating a successful interior arts business, Torres-Weiner shifted the focus of her work from commercial art to art activism in 2010, by using her art to document social conditions and to raise awareness about issues affecting immigrant communities such as family separation, access to public education, racism, and moving beyond common stereotypes. Her work is featured in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Anacostia Museum and has been exhibited in a variety of venues, including the McColl Center for Arts and Innovation, Levine Museum of the New South, the City of Raleigh Museum, the Latin American Center for Arts Gallery, the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, and the Mexican Cultural Institute at the Mexican Embassy in Washington D.C. Her story “The Magic Kite” was adapted by The Children’s Theatre of Charlotte.

    Felicia Sky Sutton is an educator, muralist, and multimedia artist who believes art creation and art education are an important pathway to self-empowerment. Working with paint, video, digital illustration, and most recently animation, She captures the essence of her subjects and tells stories through colorful portraiture, symbolism, and visual metaphors. Sutton is passionate about the use of public art to empower, build, and strengthen communities, and to bring new life to forgotten spaces. She attended Central Piedmont’s dual enrollment program before transferring to and graduating from Appalachian State University with a bachelor’s degree in art and visual culture. Her work has been in a number of group and solo exhibitions in Boone, N.C.; Charlotte and, most recently, in Philadelphia. In addition, she has been published in multiple publications and magazines.

  • Congratulations Fall 2021 ACA Scholarship Winners

    Congratulations to our fall 2021 ACA Scholarship winners!

    Each fall and spring semester, the college's Academic Related Courses (ACA) area selects seven recipients for the ACA Scholarship for awards of $600 each. To apply, students had to write an essay answering the question “Being resilient (the ability to recover quickly from difficult conditions) is a life skill that we often do not recognize. How have you been resilient in your journey as a community college student, and what does this journey look like?" Applicants are reviewed based on meeting the scholarship eligibility requirements and on their essay's quality of writing.

    Learn more about the ACA Scholarship.

  • College hosts EDI event with community partners

    In celebration of Black History Month, the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) Council at Central Piedmont Community College hosted a virtual panel discussion today featuring prominent leaders from some of its key partner organizations in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg community. The panel was comprised of:

    • Kieth Cockrell, president, Bank of America Charlotte
    • Chiquitha Lloyd, director of diversity and inclusion, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
    • Dr. Dana McDonald, vice president of talent development, Goodwill Industries of the Southern Piedmont
    • Fernando Little, vice president and chief diversity officer, Atrium Health

    During the event, Central Piedmont employees and students had the opportunity to hear the group discuss their personal stories as they relate to equity, diversity, and inclusion; and most importantly, learn about each individual’s professional experiences with actively advocating for and promoting opportunity, access, and fairness within their organizations and in the community-at-large.

    “I’d encourage all of you, no matter how you classify yourself or what you think about this campus, to speak up,” said Cockrell during the event. “We all have a voice and we all need to show a willingness to make things better.”

    Over the last 18 months, Central Piedmont has hosted a number of EDI related events for both its employees and students to attend. Examples include: inclusive leadership trainings, inclusive teaching practice sessions, examining best EDI practices from other institutions, courageous conversations, and more.

    Central Piedmont is offering the events to foster the growth of its employees and students, as well as the institution as a whole. The goal is to deliver a superior collegiate experience for students that supports their success both personally and professionally, while embedding an enhanced EDI philosophy and awareness in the college’s daily practices and processes.

  • Forbes names Central Piedmont to ‘Top 25 Best N.C. Employers’ List

    Forbes partnered with Statista to compile their third annual list of “America’s Best Employers by State,” and Central Piedmont ranked #20 among North Carolina’s businesses. The findings are based on a survey conducted from October 2020 to June 2021, of 80,000 Americans working for businesses with at least 500 employees. View the complete list of honorees.

    Central Piedmont is an attractive employment option for individuals seeking employment. The college is recognized as Mecklenburg County’s resource for academic excellence and cultural enrichment. In addition, it’s in close proximity to the Queen City’s robust public transportation system, professional sports arenas, and a number of premiere restaurant and shopping outlets that attract visitors from Mecklenburg County and beyond.

    At present, close to 40,000 students call Central Piedmont home. With eight locations, it is one of the largest community colleges in the Carolinas and serves people of all ages who seek a real-world, affordable, hands-on education that will transform their lives and strengthen the economic, social, and cultural environment of Mecklenburg County.

    To learn how to join the Central Piedmont family, visit the college’s Human Resources Web page.

     

  • College welcomes students to spring 2022 semester

    More than 15,000 students from Mecklenburg County and beyond converged at Central Piedmont Community College on Monday, Jan. 10, as the college kicked off its 2022 spring semester.

    Throughout the day, Student Engagement representatives and other staff members were stationed at information tables across all six Central Piedmont campuses to help ease students’ first day of class.

    Representatives were on site to guide students to classes, answer their questions, and provide them with important college information, such as valuable campus resources, parking guidelines and available extracurricular activities.

    The college offers nearly 300 programs to get students real-world ready, providing them with an affordable and hands-on education that can help them fast track into a career pathway or lay the foundation for a four-year degree.

    Registration for the spring term remains open. Enroll today!